Business Sellers’ Articles

The pandemic upended expectations for both business buyers and sellers in 2020, but not necessarily in negative ways. The past year saw one of the steepest year-over-year declines in Main Street business sales, according to BizBuySell’s Insight Report released January 21, 2021. The quarterly report, which tracks and analyzes business-for-sale transactions, stated that 7,612 business transactions closed, a 22% drop from 2019. Looking forward, the news is more promising. Pent-up demand combined with the Fed’s aggressive...

Once again, Teya Vitu has written a thoughtful and timely piece for Santa Fe's small business community in today's Santa Fe New Mexican.This is the year just about every business owner is wondering, how long can I last?The coronavirus drags on with no sense of when a mask-free, mass-gathering-restored normal will resume.Businesses have failed. More businesses will fail. But do businesses with a fuzzy horizon need to shut down forever?Not at all, insists...

A recent white paper by Deloitte explores strengths intrinsic to family business that may give these enterprises a relative advantage during this unusual year. Interestingly, the subject of business culture is once again comes into focus. "Alongside the millions of healthcare professionals and volunteers, some family businesses are being branded as 'heroes' by their local and national communities in the current crisis," the paper states. "This often comes down to the family values that have...

When the variable of family is added to the equation of selling a business, the situation can get rather messy.  Family usually complicates everything and businesses are, of course, no exception.  Ken McCracken’s recent article “Family business: to sell or not to sell?” 6 questions to help you make the right decision,” seeks to decode the complexities so often associated with family businesses. Consider the Market  The foundation of determining whether or not now is the right...

Employee engagement is a hot topic in workplace research. According to a recent Gallup survey, "The percentage of 'engaged' workers in the U.S. -- those who are involved in, enthusiastic about, and committed to their work and workplace -- is now 34%, tying its highest level since Gallup began reporting the national figure in 2000. The percentage who are 'actively disengaged' -- workers who have miserable work experiences -- is now at its lowest level (13%),...

Multiples are tricky things to figure out when you’re valuing a business for sale. Lots of opinions are floating around, most stemming from imperfect information. Uncle Bob’s golf buddy sold his widget store for a million bucks based on a multiple of five! Such “buddy wisdom” can lead you astray. Unrealistic expectations can result in a price point that the market simply won’t support. Your business languishes with little to no buyer activity. First Things First So,...

"Even if you build a business with zero intention of selling it for a big payday, and even if you never do actually sell, you should still build your business as if you are going to sell it someday. Building a business with this mindset will make the entire operation run more efficiently—you’ll be able to see how your business is trending overall, maintain a cleaner financial picture, and implement better standard operating procedures," writes Gregory Elfrink...

If you are preparing your business for sale, you need to start to think like a buyer. Customer concentration is a red flag to potential buyers. A company with more than 15 percent of its revenue dependent on one client is vulnerable. That client might leave shortly after you sell your business. A buyer will recognize this risk.  Follow these tips to minimize risk for the potential buyer and better position your business to sell...

Do You Need a Business Valuation? Whether you’re buying or selling a business, a business valuation is a necessary step in the process. You might be more familiar with the term "business appraisal." These two interchangeable terms describe a complicated process used to determine what a business is worth. There is no "cookie cutter" way to do this. There are different types of business valuations for different circumstances. There are some circumstances where a formal valuation is needed. In other...

Franchise businesses rank as one of the leading business opportunities. Many entrepreneurs opt to buy a franchise business. Franchises offer a host of appealing benefits including stability, a proven concept, as well as a network of established resources. To see current franchise businesses for sale, click here. If you are considering exiting your franchise, follow these tips for reselling a franchise business. Your Guide to Reselling a Franchise According to recent findings from the International Business Brokers Association (IBBA), experts have...

Zia-ConfidentialThe businesses shown for sale on our website vary in price, location and industry, but practically all have one thing in common. Rarely do we disclose the identity. There’s multiple reasons behind this decision. When you buy an established business, you are acquiring more than furniture, fixtures, equipment and leasehold improvements. You are buying a proven model, a good name in the community, and established vendor and customer relationships. The very attributes that make a business successful may be jeopardized when it becomes publicly known that it is for sale.

Message Control

If a business’ for-sale status begins to circulate in the community, some may read this as a sign that the business is distressed. In most instances, the opposite is usually the case. Personal more so than financial reasons tend to drive a business owner’s decision to exit their company. Most sellers wait to go to market until they have a solid, sustained track record of growth. While the business is listed, they continue to focus on growing market share, revenue and bottom line profits. There are other potentially negative consequences. Vendors may begin to identify alternative outlets for their wares or services. Employees become nervous, weigh their options and circulate their resumes. Competitors could be emboldened to poach employees or encroach upon their customer base. Confidentiality allows the seller and the ultimate new owner to control this message. The latter decides when it makes sense to make this information publicaly known. Some wait a month or longer after the paperwork is officially inked to have the time to secure important relationships.
who-buys-a-nm-businessBuyers buy a small business for many of the same reasons that sellers sell businesses: They want to secure their futures. Our job is to recognize who is serious and who is not to save our sellers effort, time and frustration. We have put safeguards in place to help protect our clients from frivolous tire-kickers. If the buyer is not serious, the sale will never close, and the sellers' time will have been wasted. As will ours. We don't let it get to that stage. Our buyer screening provides us with an overview of a prospect's capabilities, experience and qualifications. Once we have confirmed their financial ability, secured a Non-Disclosure Agreement, and are reasonably confident about their commitment to buying a business, we invite them in to our office for a meeting or converse with them over the phone. These conversations familiarize us with their talents, strengths and motivations.

[caption id="attachment_2544" align="alignleft" width="288"] Courtesy of Albuquerque Business First[/caption] Damon Scott Reporter- Albuquerque Business FirstMay 5, 2014If the city’s Downtown Albuquerque plans coalesce as hoped, could the real and perceived barriers between the corridor and East Downtown melt away? Last week, the city announced a slew of plans to revitalize Downtown. Those plans include an attempt to harness the momentum and opportunity already taking place with its EDo neighbors. All the activity would have big implications for the city’s...